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English language backwards?

topic posted Thu, October 16, 2008 - 11:03 AM by  Unsubscribed
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The other day I was looking at a sign that was paper on a glass door. I was behind it so it was backwards and it almost seemed like the German language. Am I crazy? Is there something to this?
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  • Re: English language backwards?

    Thu, October 16, 2008 - 12:02 PM
    Couldn't tell you… I've always been good at reading backwards, upside down and both.
    • Re: English language backwards?

      Thu, October 16, 2008 - 12:47 PM
      I think you are crazy to think that we could judge whether or not you are crazy on this little information.
      • Re: English language backwards?

        Thu, October 16, 2008 - 3:24 PM
        Yes, it's a true but little-known fact that English backwards is actually German. Linguists, long stunned by this ironic result of language change over the past 1000 years, are still unable to explain the shifts that caused this state of events, but your post is a perfect example:

        "The other day I was looking at a sign that was paper on a glass door. I was behind it so it was backwards and it almost seemed like the German language. Am I crazy? Is there something to this?"

        backwards gives the German:

        "Sith ot gnihtemos ereht si? yzarc I ma? Egaugnal Namreg eth ekil demees tsomla it dna sdrawkcab saw ti os ti dniheb saw I. Rood ssalg a no repap saw haht ngis a ta gnikool saw I yad rehto eth."

        Although gramatically perfect German, the translations do not always correspond exactly. Your post technically translates back to English as:

        "What have I been smoking? The carpet? Noam Chomsky is my illegitimate father. My mother, however, used crack while pregnant, have a nice day."

        Intriguing, isn't it?
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          Re: English language backwards?

          Fri, October 17, 2008 - 10:21 AM
          Well, also to be considered is the Indo-European family tree of languages. Seems like some migration arrow of souls might have spoken backward to sound soft, perhaps not to impress and command dogs and horses as much.
          • Re: English language backwards?

            Fri, October 17, 2008 - 12:37 PM
            You're onto something. After all, once those soft-spoken Saxons crossed the Channel they set right to work buidling cities and mostly forgot about domesticated animals, didn't they?
            Probably explains why the English have never been fond of dogs or horses since.

            Read any Sapir? You'd like him.
        • Re: English language backwards?

          Sat, October 18, 2008 - 10:44 AM
          What have we been smoking? Well, back in the day, when my friends and I smoked perfectly harmless, natural, organic stuff that just happened to cause one to get the munchies... Anyway. We had a great game of saying things backwards. Don't know why. It just seemed fun at the time.

          The backward version of the post is quite interesting. The only word that looked remotely German to me was "ereht." I'm pretty sure it is not truly a German word, but it did catch my attention as a possibility.

          Then amusingly, I noticed "sdrawkcab" which immediately became "drawback" in my mind. Interesting, eh?

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