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Explain Syllable to a 7 year old

topic posted Sat, April 21, 2007 - 7:49 PM by  devilchicken
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  • Re: Explain Syllable to a 7 year old

    Sat, April 21, 2007 - 8:38 PM
    words broken up into 'complete' sounds.

    how many times your chin drops when saying a word

    smallest part of a word ( smallest grouping of consonants and vowels)

    best explained with compound words like to-geth- er or dis-cus-sion
  • Re: Explain Syllable to a 7 year old

    Sat, April 21, 2007 - 8:51 PM
    The number of claps per word.
    • Unsu...
       

      Re: Explain Syllable to a 7 year old

      Sun, April 22, 2007 - 6:08 AM
      you might be able to find age-appropriate English lessons somewhere...
      either online or from another source.

      Most standard English lessons for kids have been heavily reviewed by all sorts of professionals from the field, including child psychologists, etc.
      • Re: Explain Syllable to a 7 year old

        Sun, April 22, 2007 - 8:58 AM
        use a drum.

        Sometimes they get it and sometimes they don't. Some of this has to do with developmental age, not age in years. It' doesn't hurt to keep trying if they aren't ready developmentally, then it's just a precurser that'll help them when they are ready.
  • Re: Explain Syllable to a 7 year old

    Sun, April 22, 2007 - 9:24 AM
    So, now, having a child and teaching or explaining (trying to) why the English language is what it is, is very challenging. There are so many exceptions and broken rules. Yikes.

    Here's what i said grammar was: The rules of writing and speaking English.

    Make sense?
    • Re: Explain Syllable to a 7 year old

      Sun, April 22, 2007 - 10:05 AM
      My sister took linguistics in University. She's great at picking up on what children do with the English language that are natural leaps. For expample: "I gotted a candy"
      We automatically think that the child just doesn't get it, but in reality, they are picking up the past tense use of 'ed'. I love hearing stuff like this, because it's allowing an exception to our own rule, which is in fact following it. Add to that the inevitability of that child picking up on the correct way of saying it, relieves me. I grew up with a grammer queen (really, my ma is brilliant with this stuff) and found that I was (and still am being) corrected so often that it drove me around the bend. This exception relieves pressure that I might've put on my kids, following suit.
      • Re: Explain Syllable to a 7 year old

        Sun, April 22, 2007 - 10:23 AM
        I totally agree. She is getting the patterns, and that's exciting to see. (For math!)

        But man, i am really struggling with trying to explain why half of English is an 'exception'. I end up saying, "the only thing you can do is memorize and look around."
  • Re: Explain Syllable to a 7 year old

    Mon, April 23, 2007 - 9:44 AM
    When you explain that syllable is a part or beat in a word, you could use her name as an example (if you haven't already). Does your daughter have two or more syllables in her name? Otherwise "Mommy", "Daddy", "spanking", :-) etc.
    • Re: Explain Syllable to a 7 year old

      Mon, April 23, 2007 - 9:52 AM
      Perhaps the thing to do is give up and show the English language the disrespect it deserves in this department. I tell my offspring how rediculous our language is. This seems to make them want to find the exceptions, and in order to do so, one must first know the rules.

      They need to know the right emPHAsis on the right sylLAble. If they're clever enough to see what you're doing with putting emphasis on the wrong syllable, they might understand syllables better.
      • Re: Explain Syllable to a 7 year old

        Mon, April 23, 2007 - 4:53 PM
        I work with speech and language delayed youngsters and the way I explain syllable to them is "the music of words" How many beats or claps per word = the syllable. Of course, I need to demonstrate a few hunded times...but they eventually get it. :O)
        • Re: Explain Syllable to a 7 year old

          Tue, April 24, 2007 - 5:21 AM
          Taking the music idea further:

          When a word is sung, it may be sung in one or more notes. A syllable is part of the word that would be sung with one note.

          Karl
          • Re: Explain Syllable to a 7 year old

            Tue, April 24, 2007 - 6:18 PM
            It helps for kids to know that English is an amalgamated language...

            Consider that Spanish has mostly consistent enunciation rules,
            (I would assume that German, French, etc do also)
            As the melting pot of language, English assimilates faster than it identifies...
            And Because language evolves so quickly
            the rules can't keep up.

            (Did that make sense?...)
            • Re: Explain Syllable to a 7 year old

              Tue, April 24, 2007 - 8:25 PM
              to me, but perhaps not to the 7 yr old for whom we are speaking. grins.

              I had a chance to try this out this morning on my school bus run. The 7 year old that I asked about syllables said she didn't know what they were, but when I told her it's like beats that each word has, then used her name as an example. The lights came on immediately as she pointed to each and every one of the 30-some kids on the bus and said the syllables of their names. How cool to see that happen.
            • Re: Explain Syllable to a 7 year old

              Thu, April 26, 2007 - 5:04 AM
              "It helps for kids to know that English is an amalgamated language...

              Consider that Spanish has mostly consistent enunciation rules,
              (I would assume that German, French, etc do also)
              As the melting pot of language, English assimilates faster than it identifies...
              And Because language evolves so quickly
              the rules can't keep up.

              (Did that make sense?...) "

              No.

              What is meant by
              enumciation rules
              assimulates
              identifies
              in this context?

              Karl

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